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Summer’s final stretch
And why fall isn't here yet

Celestial fall officially started …

on September 21st.

Comparison of night and day time temperatures in Naples, Florida to farther “Up North”

But in south Florida,

it’s still a waiting game before autumn starts to kick in.

Daytime highs are still in the high 80s and night time lows are still above 70 degrees.

According the book Florida Winter, fall in Florida officially commences with the onset on two consecutive nights that drop below 60 degrees. The animated map below shows that typically happens around the fourth month of November for south Florida.

Animation of when fall “typically” arrives to the Florida peninsula

If that seems like a long wait,

Not to worry: Fall doesn’t happen in one fell swoop.

We get plenty of signs along the way.

Signs of fall
Fall arrives in many ways, just not temperatures

Signs of fall in the swamp are subtle,

But they are there if you know where to look.

Early October:
Resurrection fern shrinks
to shriveled state indicating
less rain
Late October:
Dwarf cypress prairie
become needle bare indicating
less daylight hours
Early November:
Cold water seeps into boots
indicating lower air temperatures
Late November:
The cypress-pine
swamp mosaic really
starts to “pop”

Can you think of others?

What is The Water cycle?

Think of it as the four season, only wetter, unless of course there’s a drought. Oh, and all droughts end in flood.

What is HydrologY?

It’s the study of water, in all its forms, and wherever it goes.

What is Go Hydrology?

It’s a place where we try to have a conversation with the water, that lay enthusiasts and technical experts can enjoy.

Our Goal

To celebrate and illuminate the water cycle as it unfolds. We didn’t invent the water wheel, we just try to make it better.

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(0) Water Blog

Table of Contents


(1) Water Cycle

water cycle

Instructional kit
Perils of doing it yourself

You see them all the time in text books:

“Still life” diagrams of the water cycle.

As pretty as they look ….

The real trick is getting them to spin.

Easier said than done:

As multi-disciplinary as those diagrams appear (or proselytize) to be, they have a starchy and static and sort of abstract quality, as if they are stuck in time and their arrows stuck-in-place as if to say “yes, this is how the water cycle works, but don’t bother with the exact numbers or where all the water is now as we speak because it’s too complicated to know.” The truth is: Weather people tend to stick to the sky, and the water suppliers focus on what’s coming out of the ground, and home owners on their sprinkler heads, and gate keepers on their individual gates.

But what if we could unite the water cycle, each gear great and small …

And watch them them spin around in real time?

Water is all around us, and constantly in motion

Trust me,

It’s harder than it looks.

One wrong turn and all the water runs out.

View Water Cycle Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


(2) Watersheds

Watersheds of south Florida

Okeechobee Foothill?
How time turned a dike into a levee

For as easy as it is to see on a map …

Lake Okeechobee is deceivingly hard to find on the ground.

Map of Lake Okeechobee

The reason?

Hoover Hill would seem partly to blame.

Listen to the podcast to find out more.

Sometimes called a levee and other times a dike

The earthen embankment both blocks the view from its base and promises a scenic vista from its top only to leave you wondering –standing at its crest and looking inward — where the lake starts and if it’s there at all.

Hoover Hill (left) and Lake (right)

With everyone thinking about how to optimally regulate the Lake’s stage, its important to remember that from a design standpoint, the dike-turned-levee was built first and foremost to control (repress) water levels on the outside, not inside, of the levee …

And with the design goal (on the outside) being dry arable ground.

View Watershed Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


(3) Water Table

water table

View Water Table Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


(4) Ecology

ecology

Signs of fall
Fall arrives in many ways, just not temperatures

Signs of fall in the swamp are subtle,

But they are there if you know where to look.

Early October:
Resurrection fern shrinks
to shriveled state indicating
less rain
Late October:
Dwarf cypress prairie
become needle bare indicating
less daylight hours
Early November:
Cold water seeps into boots
indicating lower air temperatures
Late November:
The cypress-pine
swamp mosaic really
starts to “pop”

Can you think of others?

View Ecology Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


(5) Weather

Weather Drop

Summer’s final stretch
And why fall isn't here yet

Celestial fall officially started …

on September 21st.

Comparison of night and day time temperatures in Naples, Florida to farther “Up North”

But in south Florida,

it’s still a waiting game before autumn starts to kick in.

Daytime highs are still in the high 80s and night time lows are still above 70 degrees.

According the book Florida Winter, fall in Florida officially commences with the onset on two consecutive nights that drop below 60 degrees. The animated map below shows that typically happens around the fourth month of November for south Florida.

Animation of when fall “typically” arrives to the Florida peninsula

If that seems like a long wait,

Not to worry: Fall doesn’t happen in one fell swoop.

We get plenty of signs along the way.

View Weather Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


(6) Water Control

Water Drop

View Water Control Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


(7) Cultural Waters

cultural waters

Age of litter
Geologic evolution of a tin can

How old is this marl prairie?

Judging from this upper layer I would say a good thirty years old.

If this were a car, we’d call it a classic

That’s when they stopped making pull tab cans.

The label was too faded to read.

About a week later I ran into this can floating plain as day in the center of a small cypress dome. It was also a pull tab, thus presumably about the same age, but I was shocked to discover in picking it up that its label read as clear as day. And that was one thick can! They don’t make ‘em like that anymore.

It didn’t hurt it was protected by the shade.

The aluminum on this can was surprisingly thick

Bottom Line:

I wasn’t sure if I should pick it up and haul it out, or let it stay, untouched, as a mid-1970s archaeological find?

View Cultural Water Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


(8) Tidal Waters

tidal

Long walk off short pier
It wasn't always a dead end

It’s a short walk on Naples Pier before you have to turn around.

But did you know it used to be the only road out of town?

Brief history of Naples Pier

That was before south Florida had roads.

Residents, tourists and supplies all traveled to Naples by boat.

What we know today as Old Naples was the entire town.

All the rest of modern-day Naples was swamp.

Most recent closure

Today the closest remnant of the swamp is twenty miles away.

Now that is a long walk!

View Tidal Water Subtopics

Jump to Headlines: Water Cycle | Watersheds | Table | Ecology | Weather | Control | Cultural | Tidal


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