How To: Read a Rain Chart
I get it, charts can be boring (without narration)

Not that I’m a wildly dynamic speaker …

Nor are rain charts especially charismatic.

Bob has a one-on-one conversation with a rain chart

But combine the two together and I think you get, well — I think you’ll see the result. At the heart of the issue is what I’ve been told so many times: “Bob, you make a splendid rain chart, but most people don’t know how to read them.” And so my journey began, hours after hours, years upon years, in the quest to make the perfect rain chart. My conclusion: I think the only way to give a rain chart its due is to allow it to talk, and speak for itself. Okay, I’ll admit. I had to add the voice. And yes, I had to juice up the charts a bit (some would say with too many colors). Just don’t say I didn’t try.

Comparison of dry season rainfall, from 1970 to present. Cool color-coded bars indicate wet winters and warm color-coded bars indicate drier than normal winter.

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#Overheard: South Florida’s water year starts on May 1st, but the wet season doesn’t officially kick in until around May 20th.

Click “Read More” to see all the hydrographs!

Monthly rainfall in Big Cypress National Preserve. The light gray bands shows the 40 year monthly max and min, the dark gray band shows the normal range and the while line shows the median for each month.

Calendar Chart of Monthly Rainfall in Big Cypress National Preserve. I’ve always love this graph. It looks like Pez! It shows monthly rainfall in calendar format from 1970 to present. While the wet and dry seasons really jump out, it’s also fun to nose down into individual months, for example, like this most recent April that prevented the swamp from diving into a deep drought.

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