Lectures

Join Bob for a series of lectures on the hydrology of the swamp. You won’t find this in the university, nor will it help you toward a degree. | Speaking Water | Firelight Radio Podcast | Narrated movies | Power-point lectures | Water tutorials | Water Writings | Measured Water | Fireside waters | Visit basins | Visit water cycle| About blog | Return to main blog

Intro - Mandatory Water Training

How to get your certificate afterwards, and is there a test?

By Robert V. Sobczak

Many have asked:

Am I eligible for an advanced degree (or equivalent certificate, even a plaque) upon completing a Go Hydrology lecture?

Never perfect, always interesting

Good news: The answer is yes.

And even better, it’s all based on the honor system.

Here at Go Hydrology we know that many people like to decorate their walls with commemorative plaques, framed photographs and other paraphernalia that touts who they are, what they’ve done and why they are so qualified. No such wall is complete without a hydrology certificate. Sure, you could go for a Master’s Degree, a professional license, or even get your Ph.D., but not matter how ornately framed any of those certificates, wouldn’t the wall always be a little bit bare without a Go Hydrology certificate tying it all together.

Frankly folks, you can’t be properly educated without updated and locally-relevant water cycle credentials. If you were previously accredited in a water cycle outside of your current watershed or in a different state, it complements but does not replace local water cycle credentials.

And that’s where Go Hydrology steps in to help.

Please print upon completing a lecture

Recent Lectures

lectures

Training Certificates
How do I get credit for water courses?

Many have asked:

Am I eligible for an advanced degree (or equivalent certificate, even a plaque) upon completing a Go Hydrology lecture?

Never perfect, always interesting

Good news: The answer is yes.

And even better, it’s all based on the honor system.

Here at Go Hydrology we know that many people like to decorate their walls with commemorative plaques, framed photographs and other paraphernalia that touts who they are, what they’ve done and why they are so qualified. No such wall is complete without a hydrology certificate. Sure, you could go for a Master’s Degree, a professional license, or even get your Ph.D., but not matter how ornately framed any of those certificates, wouldn’t the wall always be a little bit bare without a Go Hydrology certificate tying it all together.

Frankly folks, you can’t be properly educated without updated and locally-relevant water cycle credentials. If you were previously accredited in a water cycle outside of your current watershed or in a different state, it complements but does not replace local water cycle credentials.

And that’s where Go Hydrology steps in to help.

Please print upon completing a lecture

lectures

Go to Power Points

History of Go Hydrology

Origins of a blog
On your mark, get set, Go Hydrology!

Ecosystems evolve over time …

But it’s the initial conditions that sometimes matter most of all.

The Power Point was originally presented at a conference

Here’s the story (above video) of how Go Hydrology got its start, plus some lessons learned along the way, and as always the unexpected twists. What was the biggest lesson? Probably the Rule of the Ninja: “Never fear, never doubt and never overthink.” Another lesson learned was that appetite comes while eating, or in other words, getting started is the hardest part.

As for the twists? I go back to the beginning: I never set out to be a blogger. It just happened over time, or rather all of a sudden. Am I a good blogger? I think it’s a skill I’ve refined over time. But I can write until the cows come home. The bigger trick is organizing the information that it becomes a helpful and enriching resource, which brings me full circle to where I am today. In the early years I shunned the word blog and blogger, fancying myself a more serious writer and the website being less about the words and more about the charts. Fast forward to today, and I’ve embraced the blog for all it’s worth. A blog is a powerful way to organize and share information in ways I am only starting to learn.

History of flood and fire
As presented at GEER 2021

Here’s the thirteen minute presentation

I gave at the recent Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER) conference on Tuesday April 21, 2021.

GEER 2021 Video

Normally, a talk like this, you give it once and nobody hears it again.

And that means only a couple dozen people at most. Thus it feels good to be able to post the video here. Partly that’s possible because it was a Zoom conference and I had to tape it in advance.

Stunnning conclusion: The swamp is flood and fire adapted

But it is also in tune with my personal philosophy as a hydrologist, which goes something like this: I may not know everything, but I know enough to share.

I’m still working on my catch phrase by the way. Enjoy!

P.S. Here’s a supplemental video expands on the discussion above by touching on the topic how initial conditions powerful influence our personal understanding (and biases) of about an ecosystem. As the years and decades pass, the ecosystems change, yet so often we find our thinking moored and mired in the past in ways that both illuminate and cloud our thinking.

Initial impressions sometimes need revisiting

Read more