Easy Trivia

wet season

Mystery: Summer wet season’s botanical clue?
Hint: Think country mouse, city mouse

The start of fall is easy to see in the swamp: Look no farther than the needles of the cypress trees turning brown then falling off. But does the swamp have a similar botanical clue that signals the start of the summer wet season?

a. Pond apples start to ripen and fall

b. Gumbo Limbo’s bark peals

c. Royal Poinciana’s bright orange flowers

d. Sawgrass blooms begin to appear

e. Brazilian Pepper berries turn red

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Click “Read More” to find the answer: “Nearly 97% of the world’s water is salty or otherwise undrinkable.” Overheard

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product blog

Origin of Go Hydrology?
And how it evolved over time

Everything has its origin story, and some things evolve over time. And yes, there is a lot of trial and error involved, and every once in a while doing a reboot.

Can you guess how Go Hydrology got its start?

a. as part of a multi-agency watershed team

b. a database hosted at Florida Gulf Coast University

c. a blog called The South Florida Watershed Journal

d. a desire to illuminate and celebrate the water cycle as it unfolds

e. all of the above

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Answer: Click “Read More” to find out

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wave

Florida’s biggest stream?
Hint: It's bigger than the Mississippi

Florida is famous for its abundance of water. Lake Okeechobee is fed from the Kissimmee and spans as far as the eye can see, the pre-drainage Everglades spread its sheet flow from coast to coast, the headwaters of the Apalachicola reach north of Atlanta, the Suwannee River is feed from north of Atlanta and the St. Johns River famously flows north.

Can you guess Florida’s biggest stream?

a. Apalachicola River

b. The Everglades (and Big Cypress Swamp)

c. St. Johns River

d. Gulf Stream

e. Lake Okeechobee

f. Suwanee River (and Okefenokee Swamp)

g. Floridian Aquifer (and springs)

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swampulator

Florida’s biggest stream
Hint: It's salty

What’s the biggest stream in south Florida?

Answer: The Gulf Stream.

The Gulf Stream is an awesome force

It flows at the mind dizzying rate of 30,000,000,000 gallons per second. Or in more normal stream units, around 4,000,000,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). If those numbers don’t register in your mind, don’t feel bad – join the club. They are too big to conceptualize as isolated numbers. Instead, consider them relative to south Florida’s biggest flow gate – the S79 W. P. Franklin Dam and Lock along the Caloosahatchee River. It peaked at a weekly flow rate of around 25,000 during the week of Tropical Storm Fay (in 2008), and is currently at just under 2,000 cfs.

That’s where our Lake Okeechobulator comes in handy.

With a few quick clicks of its buttons, it’s telling me that if we were able to catch the entire Gulf Stream by plunking a giant imaginary bucket into the Straights of Florida (from Cuba to the Keys), it would fill up one full Lake Okeechobee volume – 5.5 million acre feet – every minute. That adds up to 1,440 full Lake Okeechobees every day. So next time you’re out on Lake Okeechobee, staring out at water as far as the eye can see — don’t forget it’s a drop in the can for the Gulf Stream, accounting for only 33 seconds worth of water passing through the Florida Straights.