Tidal Water

tidal

Mystery of the “high-high”
And why I love the low-lows

Tides are highly predictable …

But also confusing on Naples Beach, Florida.

A glimpse into the tidal mayhem

The reason: Blame the moon and sun and the position of the shoreline. The tidal cycle is semi diurnal – giving us 2 high tides and two low tides per day. But sometimes the highs are really high (i.e. high-highs) and the lows are really low (i.e. low-lows) and other times the lows and highs are in between (i.e. low-highs and high-lows) which look like a camel’s back (see above). In a nutshell, I still can’t figure it out other than tides are higher and lower during full and new moons. Even more confusing than the tides is the longshore current. Unlike where I grew up in Maryland where the longshore current always flowed south, on Naples Beach it reverses from one day to the next.

My personal favorite: A low-low. I love walking in the tidal pools and the hard flat sand feels good on my feet.

Long walk off short pier
It wasn't always a dead end

It’s a short walk on Naples Pier before you have to turn around.

But did you know it used to be the only road out of town?

Brief history of Naples Pier

That was before south Florida had roads.

Residents, tourists and supplies all traveled to Naples by boat.

What we know today as Old Naples was the entire town.

All the rest of modern-day Naples was swamp.

Most recent closure

Today the closest remnant of the swamp is twenty miles away.

Now that is a long walk!

Balance or bias
More of the same for the Lake's main spillway

LORS is dead (i.e. the old regulation schedule),

Or about to die.

Green is good (i.e. the desired range)

In its place will step LOSOM

AKA Lake Okeechobee System Operation Manual.

In a nutshell: It will send more water down the Lake’s main release valve.

Or will it be too much of a good thing? Note: Can you see the major change that occurred with the implementation of LORS in 2008? Water is constantly flowing down the channel all months of the year. Presumably that (and more) will continue under LOSOM when it takes effect.

People on the west coast of south Florida often complain …

of an East Coast Bias when it comes to managing the Everglades water.

Or is this more a case of balancing competing needs?