Before Phones

Dino

Dinosaur interviews himself
What a wonderful guest!

What’s the secret …

To a good interview?

Firelight Radio is available on Apple Podcasts and Podbean

Some would say ample research on the topic you’re trying to discuss.  Others would say having a good set of questions.  Still others would say inviting in a good guest.  But for me, the secret to a good interview starts with the host.  It isn’t so much the questions or the answers as it is the good conversation to be had.  And really, for that to occur: Is there really a need for anyone else?  Answer: I would say yes.  The caveat is you better be comfortable having a dialog with yourself first.  And that’s why in many ways this is a breakthrough interview. 

Among the topics we cover:  My new idea for a great app, new details on the Time of Great Phonelessness (i.e. Before Phones), how phones stole our memories, the difference between prescient and clairvoyant, why a ranger kept returning to the swamp and what made him stop, the difference between a tree and a large blade of grass, why cigarettes are healthier than cell phones, how banjos went viral, and more.

Ranger Days
Rudi joins Bob around the Campfire

Rudi joins Bob around the campfire …

To reminisce about the good old days.

Bob and Rudi collaborated on 12 campfire talks and three books called the Centennial Campfire Trilogy: (1) The Legend of Campfire Charlie, (2) Last Stand at Boulder Ridge, and (3) Final Campfire.

Hindsight as we say is 20/20. The reason? We have the benefit of seeing how the future played out. We survived the past, so it must have been good, and so seeps in the “nostalgia effect.” But make no mistake, they were good times, too. At this campfire, Bob interviews Rudi about the ups and downs and many memories of his rangering days. Bob does his part by introducing a new “experimental s’mores” recipe that Rudi doesn’t seem to like much. It could have been intentional on Bob’s part knowing that if they were too good Rudi would have ate the entire stockpile.

Before Phones

Phone-eating Dinosaur
But why he (probably) won't eat yours

Why does Dino eat smart phones?

Let’s just say – it’s complicated.

Don’t be afraid – Dino (probably) won’t eat your phone

For one, he’s just hungry and not only are phones very abundant in the After Phone (AP) era – nobody else is eating them. Another reason: Dino craves the chance and will do anything to get back to the geologic epoch known as Before Phone (BP). The way he sees it – the more phones he eats the greater chance he has to recreate the “pre-phones” conditions of the period during which he thrived. It was a time of Great Phonelesslness. Why else does Dino eat phones? In a word, Boogie. Dino has a evolutionary-refined sense of smell for the dreaded Boogie Phone.

What is the Boogie Phone?

Or rather who is the Boogie Phone. Let’s just say he’s always lurking. And usually closer than you think. Click here to find out more, or simply read the post below. And most of all don’t forget to listen to what Dino has to say in video above.

Before Phones

About Before Phones
It was a time of Great Phonelessness

Granted, it was a bizarre time.

People actually had to talk to each other face to face.

Introducing Dino the phone-eating dinosaur

And there were only three channels on the TV.

As unpleasant as that sounds, somehow it worked (although I have my doubts).

Dino is just trying to understand modern life

But how exactly did people survive (even thrive) before phones?

Here at Before Phones (BP) “Where the Dinosaurs Roam” we explore the latest discoveries about the Pre-Phone era. Our methodologies include interviews with other dinosaurs, the latest archeological finds and a range of other innovative research techniques.

Mysteries We Explore

Nothing to fear, Dino will not harm you (but he may eat your phone)

Here at Before Phones (BP), we are dedicate to …

Trying to understand the cryptic pre-phone era.

Unresolved questions include:

  • How people drove without texting?
  • What is was like to have only 24 photos to a roll?
  • How people (dinosaurs) coped with the boredom?

Our Goal

Dino interviewing Steve the Brontosaurus

The pre-phone era also had its charm (so they say).

Our goal is to understand how society worked without everyone staring at their phone all day (and night).

  • To inform, inspire and educate about the pre-phone era
  • Feature guests from the Before Phone (BP) era
  • Continuously improve our understanding of phonelessness
Dino

Go To Before Phones

How to write a trilogy
Evolution of a 30-minute campfire talk

Have you ever heard that saying:

“You can’t be a hero in your own hometown?”

The first podcast

Well, I think the same sort of applies to initial success.

Success too early in a process, or life, may feel good at the time, but can also be the kiss of death in the long run. Why? Success breads complacency in the same way failure inspires you to overcome.

My point is this:

Rudi and I co-wrote three books which, when we were done, inspired us to do a podcast. Both the books and the podcast were utter “initial” failures by traditional metrics. The silver lining was that I never lost faith. And it made me realize: Less about selling a product, the trilogy of books was the ultimate deep dive into exploring “big canvas” ideas that required 450,000 words of space and six years of time to properly spread out, metabolize and incubate in our minds. If you think writing a book, let alone a trilogy, is hard – try co-writing it with a Rudi! The mystery of the creative chemistry of our unlikely partnership became a reoccurring theme in the books. Our brief foray into a poorly-produced podcast (to discuss the books) was a dismal failure, too. Please listen to them and I think you’ll agree.

The second podcast

But all clouds have a silver linings:

The process, and those failures, was how the Nature Folk Movement (NFM) was born.

Thank God for failure – really it’s the only way we improve.

P.S. Although a tiny taste of success isn’t bad, either.

Go to Trilogy