Tides

wave

Florida’s biggest stream?
Hint: It's bigger than the Mississippi

Florida is famous for its abundance of water. Lake Okeechobee is fed from the Kissimmee and spans as far as the eye can see, the pre-drainage Everglades spread its sheet flow from coast to coast, the headwaters of the Apalachicola reach north of Atlanta, the Suwannee River is feed from north of Atlanta and the St. Johns River famously flows north.

Can you guess Florida’s biggest stream?

a. Apalachicola River

b. The Everglades (and Big Cypress Swamp)

c. St. Johns River

d. Gulf Stream

e. Lake Okeechobee

f. Suwanee River (and Okefenokee Swamp)

g. Floridian Aquifer (and springs)

Read More” to find out the answer

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swampulator

Florida’s biggest stream
Hint: It's salty

What’s the biggest stream in south Florida?

Answer: The Gulf Stream.

The Gulf Stream is an awesome force

It flows at the mind dizzying rate of 30,000,000,000 gallons per second. Or in more normal stream units, around 4,000,000,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). If those numbers don’t register in your mind, don’t feel bad – join the club. They are too big to conceptualize as isolated numbers. Instead, consider them relative to south Florida’s biggest flow gate – the S79 W. P. Franklin Dam and Lock along the Caloosahatchee River. It peaked at a weekly flow rate of around 25,000 during the week of Tropical Storm Fay (in 2008), and is currently at just under 2,000 cfs.

That’s where our Lake Okeechobulator comes in handy.

With a few quick clicks of its buttons, it’s telling me that if we were able to catch the entire Gulf Stream by plunking a giant imaginary bucket into the Straights of Florida (from Cuba to the Keys), it would fill up one full Lake Okeechobee volume – 5.5 million acre feet – every minute. That adds up to 1,440 full Lake Okeechobees every day. So next time you’re out on Lake Okeechobee, staring out at water as far as the eye can see — don’t forget it’s a drop in the can for the Gulf Stream, accounting for only 33 seconds worth of water passing through the Florida Straights.

tidal

Mystery of the “high-high”
And why I love the low-lows

Tides are highly predictable …

But also confusing on Naples Beach, Florida.

A glimpse into the tidal mayhem

The reason: Blame the moon and sun and the position of the shoreline. The tidal cycle is semi diurnal – giving us 2 high tides and two low tides per day. But sometimes the highs are really high (i.e. high-highs) and the lows are really low (i.e. low-lows) and other times the lows and highs are in between (i.e. low-highs and high-lows) which look like a camel’s back (see above). In a nutshell, I still can’t figure it out other than tides are higher and lower during full and new moons. Even more confusing than the tides is the longshore current. Unlike where I grew up in Maryland where the longshore current always flowed south, on Naples Beach it reverses from one day to the next.

My personal favorite: A low-low. I love walking in the tidal pools and the hard flat sand feels good on my feet.

tidal waters

Four gulls at beach
And one big cloud

There was something about those four gulls in the distance, flapping their wings, flying overhead (and then like that they were gone,) that compelled me to take this photo before they were completely vanished out of view.

And, oh yeah …

Can you see the four gulls in the distance?

The cloud was pretty impressive, too!