Tortoise and Hare of the Swamp
And why they both deserve participation trophies

South Florida’s water cycle …

Resembles the fable of the Tortoise and the Hare.

Rainfall is fast and evaporation is slow, but over a year they usually balance out.

Think of rainfall is the Hare.

Summer rains are drenching and drainage of the swamp’s flat landscape poor. That causes water to rise rapidly and stay there through the summer and into early fall. But come mid October the wet season ends.

That’s when the Hare falls asleep and the dry season begins.

The Hare sprints ahead from late May into early fall

Enter the slow and steady Tortoise:

Evapotranspiration is slow and steady worker – some would say inexorable. As dry season weeks turn into months and the Tortoise marches on, by some point in the winter and definitely by spring pretty much all the water in the swamp is gone. Or in other words, drought …

And yes, wildfires, too.

Come spring the Tortoise catches up

But not so fast.

All it takes is one big rainstorm for the Hare to wake up, hurdle the Tortoise and sprint ahead out of sight, but not for long. Unlike the real fable of the Tortoise and the Hare, south Florida’s annual race called the water cycle has no beginning or end. Or in more scientific terms: The swamp is a flood and fire adapted ecosystem. Every square inch of flora and fauna depend on a goldilocks dosage and return interval of flood and fire to maintain the health of the swamp mosaic.

And the winner is …

Moral of the story:

The Tortoise and Hare are both winners. Participation trophies for both!

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Tidbit: The south Florida rainy season lasts from mid May to mid October, or about 5 months.

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