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Intro - Very Utilitarian Cycle

Better than the seasons and calendar year

By Robert V. Sobczak

Not only is the water cycle fun …

It’s also very practical.

Everyone’s a winner with the water cycle

Think about it: The calendar year is fatally flawed. Its start in January falls in the middle of the winter dry season. True connoisseurs of the water year know that if you want to accurately track hydrologic happenings in south Florida you need to start in May with the onset of the summer rains and lump November through April into a single dry season tally — not split it into two like the calendar year slackers will want you to do.

Even worse: Nor do the four seasons jive with water cycles two major halves — it’s wet season and dry season. The summer wet season overlaps with one spring, three summer and one fall month. Meanwhile, the winter dry season is comprised by two fall, three winter and two spring months. Yes, I agree — it’s all messed up. That’s where the water cycle steps in to save the day.

The water cycle and the seasons are inseparable

In sum, the water cycle is just a great way to stay in tune with nature at large, and water resources stewardship, too. You can’t manage the water if you don’t have your finger on its pulse. That’s where water cycle awareness factors in the most. Even better: It’s free.

Recent Blog Posts

Watersheds of south Florida

Favorite watershed?
It's a tie!

It’s a tough question:

But for me it boils down to this …

I’ve found a lot of new friends in the swamp

The rose isn’t beautiful because it’s a rose, a rose is beautiful for the time you spent with it. For that reason, I would have to say I have two favorite watersheds. The first is Up North on the continent where I grew up in Maryland. And specifically Deer Creek, or maybe the Gun Powder River, too. The first feeds into the Susquehanna River and the second straight into the Chesapeake Bay. You can take a boy away from his childhood creek, but you can’t take the creek out of the boy. And no, that’s not because I got water in my ear. Although there is the story where I got submerged under the water at the rapids at King and Queen Seat. Even just thinking about Rocks State Park as I type pings at my heart with a deep sense of nostalgia.

Over the past twenty years, I’ve bonded with the Big Cypress Swamp in a way that rivals if not exceeds my childhood connection to Deer Creek. Partly that’s because I work there, and yes I specialize in the water, too. But it’s more to the story. The cypress trees and expanse of water and the swings between flood and drought. There’s a bit of magic in the Big Cypress unlike any other place that I’ve ever been.

Runners up are Cape Cod and the Sonoran Desert. And you guessed it, they are on my list because I spent time there, too.

Wherever you are, enjoy the watershed that you’re in. And do your part to help make it a better place. Our watersheds deserve the best.

Watersheds of south Florida

Go to Watersheds

water cycle

Very utilitarian cycle
Better than the seasons and calendar year

Not only is the water cycle fun …

It’s also very practical.

Everyone’s a winner with the water cycle

Think about it: The calendar year is fatally flawed. Its start in January falls in the middle of the winter dry season. True connoisseurs of the water year know that if you want to accurately track hydrologic happenings in south Florida you need to start in May with the onset of the summer rains and lump November through April into a single dry season tally — not split it into two like the calendar year slackers will want you to do.

Even worse: Nor do the four seasons jive with water cycles two major halves — it’s wet season and dry season. The summer wet season overlaps with one spring, three summer and one fall month. Meanwhile, the winter dry season is comprised by two fall, three winter and two spring months. Yes, I agree — it’s all messed up. That’s where the water cycle steps in to save the day.

In sum, the water cycle is just a great way to stay in tune with nature at large, and water resources stewardship, too. You can’t manage the water if you don’t have your finger on its pulse. That’s where water cycle awareness factors in the most. Even better: It’s free.

water cycle

Go to Water Cycle